This page contains a selection of chapters and articles that can be accessed online.

Our culture has become too complex to understand things in disciplinary isolation

An Interview with Patricia Pisters in the Newsletter of SMART Cognitive Science, 10 May 2016. 

“I grew up in a small village in the South of the Netherlands: there was no cinema, only a library. So I grew up just reading; I went to the library with my father every Friday night. The libraries had these nice big boxes with all these cards, and I just loved ‘playing library’. At home I made every book we had – we did not have a lot of books – into library books with pockets in the inside of the cover containing return cards. I really loved that, and I also liked to play teacher: I wanted to be either a librarian or a teacher. So after high school, I first started doing a vocational teacher training course in Nijmegen, because I wanted to become a French-English teacher. But then when I was in Paris for the first time, I realized that I wanted to really learn the French language, have access to the wealth of books written in French, and I stopped the teacher training course. I went to study in Paris, which is where I discovered cinema. Then I came to Amsterdam, first to work, and then to study. I studied French and also Film Studies, a free doctorate – within this degree it was possible to compose your own program. I went back to France to do my DEA (Diplôme des études approfondies), which is comparable to a research master. In the meantime, the department film and television studies was established in Amsterdam, and professor Elsaesser who set up the program asked me to come and work there. That is how I started to teach, even before I started my PhD; then it was just natural to do also a PhD. So I had some detours: it is through French, and French literature and cinema that I ended up in the department of media studies.”

 

The Future is Now in Post-Cinema

"Flashforward: The Future is Now" (reivised version) in Shane Denson and Julia Leyda, eds. Post-Cinema: Theorizing 21st Century Cinema. Falmer: Reframe Books, 2016. pp. 1-26. Download PDF here. Read the entire issue here

The Neurothriller (popular version)

In  AEON - Ideas and Culture.  8 February 2016.

The Filmmaker as Metallurgist: Political Cinema and World Memory

In Film-Philosophy 20:1 (2016), pp. 149-167. Download PDF here. This article is part of a special issue on Film-Philosophy and a World of Cinemas, edited by David Martin-Jones. The entire issue is available in Open Access at Edinburgh University Press here

New Materialism: Intra-Agential Entanglements and the Neuro-Image

Special Issue on New Materialism, Cultural Studies Review volume 21 number 2 September 2015, pp. 120-144. 

Download PDF . The issue can be found here

 

Memory is no longer what is used to be

In: Sebastian Groes, ed. Memory in the Twenty-first Century: New Critical Perspectives from the Arts, Humanities and Sciences (New York: Palgrave, 2015,  213-216).

Download PDF

Deleuze's Metallurgic Machines

The Los Angeles Review of Books (LARB) of 8 November 2015 has published a special issue "The Event of Life" on the occasion of teh 20th anniversary of the death of Gilles Deleuze. Arne de Boever and Brad Evans asked scholars what might be said about Deleuze today. Contributions by Adrian Parr, Brian Massumi, Greg Lambert, Bracha L. Ettinger and Patricia Pisters ('Deleuze's Metallurgic Machines').

Dexter's Plastic Brain: Mentalizing and Mirroring in Cinematic Empathy

In Neurofilmology: Audiovisual Studies and the Challenge of Neuroscience. Adriano D'Aloia and Ruggero Eugeni, eds. Special Issue of Cinema & Cie.International Film Studies Journal.  Vol. XIV, No, 22/23, Fall/Winter 2014, pp. 53-63. Download PDF.

Cutting and Folding the Borgesian Map

 “Cutting and Folding the Borgesian Map: Film as Complex temporal Object in the Industrialization of Memory” in    Ekman, Ulrik, Jay David Bolter, Lily Diaz, Maria Engberg, Morten Søndergaard, eds. Ubiquitous Computing, Complexity, and Culture. New York: Routledge, 2015, pp. 322-333. Find here  PDF.